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The Official Page of Justin Bienvenue

The Plasmatic Writer

Author . Poet . Horror Writer  

                                                               Blog

Blog

Welcome to my blog. You can also find it on Medium, Goodreads and Amazon. https://medium.com/@JustinBienvenue

You will find posts on several topics:

  • Horror
  • Paranormal
  • The Wild West
  • Poetry
  • UFOs & Aliens
  • Posts on Writing
  • Book Related

Red-Horror/Paranormal/The Wild West

Blue-Poetry/Posts on Writing

Green-UFOs & Aliens

Gold-Book Related

*All other posts will be in black bold 

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The Wax Factory Character Interviews

Posted on May 29, 2019 at 6:20 PM

Character Interview with Dmitri Townsend


1. What can you tell us about yourself?


My name is Dmitri Townsend, I’m 20 years old and I attend Bartholemew Halbriar University. I’m a fun and outgoing person, I’m into history and I’m a big football fan. I’m laid back and I enjoy traveling and trying new things. I’m not a angry or violent person and I treat others as they like to be treated. I enjoy writing and art although I’m not good at either but I appreciate those who can. I was born in and grew up here in Craven Hollow and I know the rest of New York is busy but I honestly love it here and I wouldn’t trade it to be somewhere else. I’m a determined and goal driven individual,


2. Would you enter a creepy old factory?


What an odd question(laughs). Uhh..I mean yeah sure why not. I’m up for an adventure and I mean my best friend Derek is into abandoned places so I’m sure I totally would because he’d likely pressure me into it(laughs again). Yeah, I would totally enter a creepy factory as long as it isn’t haunted.


3. How much does friendship mean to you?


It means a lot to me. I have a great group of friends whom I cherish. I know they are there for me like I am for them. There’s my girlfriend Melina who is also one of my best friends, she’s amazing and she’s also a great friend who is a great listener. My best friend Derek and I have been friends since like elementary school, he’s fun and most people don’t get him but I’m glad to call him a friend. Then there’s my friend Tasha who is Melina’s best friend. Tasha and I are cool, we aren’t as tight but I am glad to call her a friend. Friendship means a great deal to me as does family and in a lot of ways I feel like they are my family. It’s great to have friends because I don’t like being or feeling alone.


4. Who’s the most important person in your life?


Well I’m sure you can guess after the last question, that would be my girlfriend Melina. She’s my everything and she means the world to me. I’ve known her since sixth grade and we’ve been together since eighth grade when I asked her out on the bus during a field trip. Melina gets me, understands me and I’m so lucky to have her in my life and to be able to call her my girl. I’m not the jealous type so I know Melina has her guy friends and that’s fine and I totally trust her and I know I’m as important to her as she is to me. She truly is the most important person in my life and I think in a year or two I’d like to make her my wife.


5. If you were in a life or death situation how do you think you’d manage?


Wow that’s quite the question!(laughs). Damn, uh, I’m not sure. I’d like to think I’d hold my own, step up and take initiative and I’d make the right decisions although I don’t know how I’d find myself in a life or death situation. I live a casual and calm life so I imagine it would really make me think and even take a toll on me but in the end I would put money on me managing well and doing my best to make the right decisions for myself and anyone else involved.


6. What’s something people would be surprised to know about you?


I believe in aliens and I’m into the Roaring 20's. I know random right? I just find aliens fascinating and I believe that they exist, have been here and even walk among us not to sound like a nut or anything! And yeah the Roaring 20's just seems like it was such a fun and simple time to be alive. I may live it up like they did when it’s 2020(laughs) I’ll be styling and be all suave. I just really enjoy learning about the 20's.


Character Interview with Gustav Vandaldrake


1. What can you tell us about yourself?


My name is Gustav Vandaldrake and I am in the wax business. My business takes up most of my life as I don’t do much outside of it. Although when I’m not working my hobbies include stamp and rock collecting as well as listening to my vintage jazz collection, oh I do love my jazz! I have been married to my lovely wife Isabella for over 40 years and I cannot imagine life without her. I enjoy a good cup of coffee or joe as the young people like to call it these days. I enjoy cooking because my wife grew tired of always cooking for me(chuckles) and I am a very kind and gentle man. I enjoy making the most of life just as I did when I was younger and what is it they say? You’re only as young as you feel!


2. What exactly is a wax factory and what can you tell us about your business?


(Laughs) You certainly aren’t the first person to ask me this. Wax factories were popular back in the day in the early 1800's. From a general standpoint, regular wax factories served as places that made candles and candle accessories or they made wax within the factories and from there the wax was sent out to other places to be used as candles or your other basic wax needs.


The Wax Factory is a bit different you see, The Wax Factory didn’t just make candles nor do I in fact I intend to go by my great grandfather’s old creations. The Wax Factory here is bigger and broader. Here it deals with not just candles but everyday items and unique items all to be created from wax. The wax is made here, things are created from it and most of all it acted and will continue to act as a shop where people can come in to see what we have and buy these elaborate wax items. I’ve done a lot of reading on my great grandfather’s business from old books down in the basement and my vision is to make this place as authentic to how it was back in the day. Oh I’m giddy just thinking about it!


3. Care to tell us a little history on the town of Craven Hollow?


Oh heavens if I didn’t know any better I’d swear you’re asking me about the history of this town because I’m old! It’s quite alright, while I’m not a historian I do know a little bit about this town. Craven Hollow is one of the smallest towns in the state of New York. It was founded I want to say back in the 1600s? Not quite sure there and it for the most part has always been a quiet little town where people come to relax and get away from you know, the busy streets of New York. The city once had two big businesses, The Wax Factory and a fur trade business although if my memory serves me correct the fur business didn’t last long nor pan or as many had expected. It can be a bit eerie and odd in town if your not from Craven Hollow, people have told me that although I haven’t the slightest idea what they mean!(laughs). The town is peaceful and I also remember hearing something about a statue being built here and that Bartholemew Halbriar to whom the school is named after had part in it’s creation. Craven Hollow is a joyous place and has great history!


4. What is it about wax that you love so much?


I don’t love it half as much as I’m told my great grandfather did! It’s hard to explain but I guess in some ways wax reminds me of clay. It’s a thick material and it’s easy to work with, and many people only see it as what candles are made from but those people must not have big imaginations. I love wax because I love the vision and work my great grandfather put into the place and the passion he had for it and in many ways I think it got passed down onto me. I enjoy creating and wax is the material of my choice. It’s an underrated substance, it works nicely with fire and I just have a way with it that gives me a extraordinary feeling!


5. What do you know about your great grandfather Ghyslain?


What a lovely and kind man he was! Oh I remember my parents and my grandfather telling me about him and he fascinated me. He was a hard working man and he gave job opportunities to so many including woman. He loved just loved wax and he and his partner Edward Langston were quite the creators when it came to wax. My great grandfather was a visionary and I think in many ways was a big part in this town’s success. Without him people would not have had jobs and I just know he was a very generous and friendly man. He was the type of guy you’d want to know and would appreciate knowing.


6. Do you think young people will appreciate The Wax Factory?


Oh I hope they will! Oh how I hope they will. I’m not up to date with what young people of today like and don’t like but I at least hope that they will stop and check out the history of not only this factory but a key part of business within their city. I think those who enjoy history, like big old factories and like wax will enjoy the Wax Factory! I also plan on making part of the factory a museum but not all of it will be a museum, as I said before it’s going to be a place where people can come and buy things made of wax and I hope the young people of today will appreciate that and I don’t see why they wouldn’t.


Be sure to get your copy of The Wax Factory!

Why Was Killing the Normal?

Posted on May 28, 2019 at 4:25 PM

You ever watch or read a western where a guy looks at another guy wrong and before you know it one of them’s dead? Or a guy rides into town and his sole mission is to kill as many men as he can or kill the fastest gunslinger in town? Why? Why is this normal? Just why exactly was killing as normal as waking up in the morning? I mean sure, people are killed everyday but back in the Wild West days it was just unnatural and a bit odd and unsettling if you really sit down, look back and think about it. Just because a guy looked at you wrong, you shoot him dead. He eyed your favorite saloon girl, you shoot him dead. He doesn’t drink whiskey, you shoot him dead. His horse is faster and more majestic than yours, you shoot him dead. Tired of these? Okay, the point is simple, killing for the sole sake of killing is inhuman but in the wild west it seems like everyone was easily frazzled and could get upset without any second thought.



The wild west was cool and all and you probably even say “hey I wish I was a part of that time!” but have you ever sat and thought about it like truly thought about it? You think of all the great adventures you could have and all the saloon girls you could get but you probably don’t think of the fact that you wouldn’t get clean everyday and worse you wouldn’t think about how well you could hold up in a fight before you’re shot dead. The truth is you should because killing was the normal and as cool and awesome as it may have looked it was a downright dirty and despicable time and killing back then were as normal as learning your abc’s today. If you could hold your own then that’s great and all but imagine living knowing you could die just for looking at a guy wrong. Then again some people are touchy on social media but this isn’t the same in the slightest.



So why was killing so normal back in the Wild West? Because it just was? Not good enough for me. Because people were easily upset and didn’t take kindly to others? We’re getting warmer. Because back in those days it was all about the times, surroundings, survival and basic instinct? Yup that sounds about right. The wild west was just like any other era, it had certain things that made it what it was. But killing? Yes killing. It was probably no different than people dying in war everyday or the days when people carried around swords instead of pistols and rifles. It’s just a hard thing to think about though that people could just get killed and everybody thought it was normal. A big difference however is when people die in war they likely died for honor in some way, getting decapitated with a sword or gunned down in broad daylight just seems like it would really take some getting used to if one ever could get used to such a thing.

 


Also imagine watching a guy gun another guy down and then that guy goes into the saloon and orders a whiskey and everyone acts like nothing happened because they don’t want to get killed. That sounds awful to me. I mean sure I would keep my mouth shut and eyes away from the man but the fact that killing is the only thing on that man’s mind or anybody else’s is truly a terrifying thought. I’m not even going to get into the fact that I would have to kill in order to survive back then because while it’s cool to think of getting into a wild west showdown or duel with someone, I don’t know about you but I don’t want to kill anyone and I certainly don’t want them to kill me. But that was the wild west for ya. Survival of the fittest, there can be only one, you looking at me? Whatever way you wish to look at it, it’s simple..the wild west is cool to watch and read about but to be there in a place where killing was normal and getting clean was crazy talk? Count me out partner.

Can A Writer Not Be A Reader?

Posted on May 28, 2019 at 3:40 PM

They have nothing to do with one another. You don’t need to be a reader in order to be a writer because while they share the common trait of books and literature it is a reader that needs a writer but not the other way around. Readers who love certain writers wait for their favorite writer to write the next book of their favorite series. A writer doesn’t need to wait for a reader, they hope a reader jumps onto their writing. A writer should be appreciative that a reader picks up their writing but why should it matter if a writer doesn’t read? After all a writer’s audience is not other writers, they are if the author writes about writing but a fictional author no. Let me clarify that again, a writer’s audience is not other writer’s unless the genre they are writing is about writing and helping other authors.


Now everyone has their own opinion however to me what I have stated above speaks volumes and is quite clear and makes sense yet I still think I have skeptics, those who still think the opposite and that is totally in your right to have that opinion, however it is not in your right to push it in the face of those that don’t believe and result to insult people who don’t believe that writers need to read. Readers are going to read, writers are going to write. And people are going to take to social media to try and make their point even if it means disrespecting others who don’t share the same opinion as them. Let’s examine this a bit further, just because a writer doesn’t read books as often as a bookworm per say does NOT mean the following:


-The writer doesn’t read books at all(just not as much as them)

-The writer doesn’t read anything(we as humans read everyday but doesn’t mean books)

-The writer doesn’t know how to read(some people actually think this)

-The writer’s writing will suffer because they don’t read(it won’t because it has nothing to do with their writing)

-The writer doesn’t experience and take in knowledge(They do just not as much as a bookworm or traditional reader would)


The point? It hasn’t changed, just because someone doesn’t read and they are a writer doesn’t mean anything, it simply means if anything that they are more dedicated to their writing and can get more writing done because that is their choice. Not everyone is going to enjoy reading so just because someone becomes a writer they are supposed to read more? If they didn’t read a lot before than then why would becoming a writer change anything? It wouldn’t and shouldn’t. If A person doesn’t like to read then that’s their right, their choice. They should not be chastised for it. I personally do not like to read however that doesn’t mean I don’t know how to read, it doesn’t mean I don’t read books and it certainly doesn’t mean my writing suffers because of it. When I became a writer I actually started reading more and found a new appreciation not only for reading but for my fellow indie authors.


In conclusion, everyone is entitled to their opinion, writers are going to write and readers are going to read. The better question to ask is if a reader writes a few things are they considered a writer? Or are they merely readers picking up a new hobby or taking a stab at the other side of the spectrum? However you want to look at it the point remains the same that reading and writing while crucial to us as humans do not need to read in order to be writers. Writers can get inspiration from many things some may choose to do so by reading and others from taking in all around them. The choice is their’s and their’s alone. Is it easier to read or to write?


Obviously it’s easier to read that’s without question however again people will be criticized if they don’t read as writers because there’s so much irrelevant accusations and speculations of the individual. Let me clear that up in case you got confused. Some writers or people in general find reading to be difficult not because they cannot read but because they have a hard time getting into a book or simply devoting time into a book because they are busy doing something else such as writing. Read if that’s what you want to do, and write if that’s what you want to do but don’t throw shade at others because they don’t share the same appreciation for reading as you do. We are all different and we all like different things and we all enjoy similar things.

The Difference Between A Residual and Intelligent Haunting

Posted on April 10, 2019 at 7:35 PM

Ghosts. Some of us find them scary and some of us long to talk to them because they are our loved ones trying to reach out. Ghosts are beings that are still around after death. Some are good and some are bad, some interact and some are just images reliving their past experiences and cannot interact. So what exactly is the difference between a residual haunting and an intelligent haunting? Well my guest, the operator of the My Haunted Salem site on tumblr is here to explain the difference between the two. 



What is a Residual Haunting?


Residual hauntings are somewhat hard to describe, but are fairly common. Also known as “psychic impressions,” residual hauntings are considered by many as the type of haunting experienced most by people. When a ghost (person or animal) or even an event is witnessed over and over again, or doing the exact same thing, this is known as a residual haunting. It is “residual” because it is believe that energy from emotionally-charged events imprint upon our world. It is the release of this residual energy that creates the ghost person, ghost animal or ghostly scene.


Famed paranormal investigator, Frederic W. H. Myers called this type of haunting a “vertical afterimage.” A residual haunting, according to Myers’ definition, would be a memory impression left by individuals, animals or events, especially, it would seem, when under duress or from a time when there was the release of strong emotions, left as pictures in the atmosphere of a particular site.


The ghosts of residual haunting can be both seen or heard repeating the same activity. It is believed that most disembodied footsteps and many ghostly noises that are heard in a haunted place might be residual in origin. The residual sounds can be heard over and over and by different people. For example, it is said that in the Queen Mary’s Second Class Pool Room, one can still hear splashing, though the pool is now empty!


We may think of a residual haunting as a movie being replayed, day after day; and occasionally, someone is lucky enough to see or hear the encore. It is believed by ghost hunters that some events, due to strong emotional energy attached to it, imprint themselves on the environment where the event took place. Sort of “trapped in time,” the event is recorded in the atmosphere of a location. It’s the same with spirits of people – if one were to see a ghost doing the same activity over and over, and with no response to the present environment, it is likely a residual haunting. The person’s spirit is not there, in this theory, but just a phantasm of them exists, like a photograph in time. Residual hauntings are past events playing in the present but with no interaction or connection to the present.


What is a Intelligent Haunting?


Intelligent haunting are those in which the ghost interacts with the present. It is intelligent, in that the ghost may communicate, or interfere in some fashion, with those of us living on the earthly plane. The disembodied person has elected, for some reason, to stay here due to a connection with a person, place or thing. Intelligent haunting sometimes happens due to a spirit’s compelling need to deliver a message from the other side of the grave or to watch over loved ones. In addition, it is also plausible that an intelligent haunting can occur due to attachments the ghostly person feels to memories, trauma, tragedy or any other emotional tie, effectively binding the mind to:


not realizing the deceased person’s body has indeed expired

completing unfinished earthly business


re-living traumatic events, as the mind consistently replays the event in an attempt to comprehend


perhaps remaining with loved ones or persons the ghost finds like company with


not letting go due to some form of fear after death, such as fear of punishment or moving on unto the unknown


Intelligent haunting manifests typically in what some may consider to be “ghost signs.” Hiding or moving objects, doors opening and closing, hearing strange sounds, noticing a spiritual presence (e.g. goosebumps), and the disturbance of electrical devices are all examples of ghosts attempting to gain someone’s attention and communicate from the spirit realm.


One may also experience dreams and visions of loved ones, especially, right before or after sleep when most of us are more open to contact (and the left brain is quieted down). It is also not uncommon to physically see a ghostly loved one, as well, as either an apparition or shadowed form. The best thing one can do is remain open to the contact and listen to what is heard deep within as that is how ghosts primarily communicate. If you encounter a haunting, seek to speak to the spirit, using in words of peace, compassion and love.


A big thank you to my guest for this great thorough explanation on residual and intelligent hauntings. Check out her tumblr page https://myhauntedsalem.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">@myhauntedsalem for more on ghosts.

If you liked this than feel free to check out the rest of my blog for more creepy horror posts as well as other topics. Feel free to subscribe to my e-mail list

And check out the novel that inspired this very question, The Wax Factory, a modern gothic horror novel with a dap of paranormal and ghosts.

You Can't Break the Rules of Poetry

Posted on April 10, 2019 at 7:30 PM

You can’t break the rules of poetry because technically their aren’t any. I’ll wait while you read that again and calm down..go on, relax and calm down. You good? Okay. Now what I mean by there are no rules is just that. There aren’t any list of rules that state how poetry has to be or what it should and should not have. Sure there’s tons of people and sites who have come up with lists of their own of rules of poetry but these by definition are their rules and not official rules of the poetry world or community. Anything that one could consider a rule about poetry isn’t a rule but a common sense principle of writing poetry. I’ll get into examples and details in a moment but just know that if someone tells you that you broke the rules of poetry just either tell them that there are no rules or smile and walk away.


Poetry needs emotion-


Refer to my post on this. Not only does poetry not need to be written with emotion but you can write tons of poems without feeling any sort of emotion. People naturally assume that it has to be written with emotion, feeling but the truth is, it doesn’t and just because you didn’t use it doesn’t mean it won’t give the reader feelings or make them emotional.


Poetry needs to rhyme-


Anyone who believes this either doesn’t truly know or understand poetry or just assumes one thing with the other. Prose is poetry without rhyming and with the use of powerful words doesn’t involve any rhyming whatsoever. It doesn’t need to rhyme to be good and it doesn’t need rhyme to be considered poetry.


Rhymes need to connect-


Not a rule but more of that common sense principle I mentioned earlier. Let’s be honest we are all guilty of rhyming a word with another that has nothing to do with the poem it’s called being an amateur but we grow over time. A good poet finds words to rhyme that go together and if not they use a different word that rhymes or they are clever and really make that word rhyme within reason. Again this isn’t a rule but more something you pick up and understand over time.


Poetry can’t have punctuation-


Someone said this to me once when they noticed a poem I had written have several commas. I simply replied back that poetry is what you make it and can be written any way you want it to and since it’s written word like anything it needs to have proper punctuation.


Poetry needs form-


Again this should be a given so that doesn’t make it a rule. Poetry naturally needs form, structure, a way to which its written but that doesn’t mean it’s a rule.


Now do you understand? People will say poetry needs this or poetry needs that but these are the same people who believe that poetry is dead or they try way to hard to follow the very rules that they made up to appease the imaginary poetry gods that they also made up. Case in point? Poetry does not have any rules you can break, only the rules to which are essential to all things written. Just because you write different than someone else doesn’t mean you can make up rules for them. Poetry is a way of expression, writing it is no different.

#NationalPoetryMonth

Like this post? Be sure to read more on my poetry posts as well as the rest of my blog. Also feel free to subscribe to my e-mail list

Poetry Without Emotion

Posted on April 10, 2019 at 7:00 PM

Poetry. It is a way of expression, a way with words, a way in which a person writes down their feelings and emotions. However, some may be surprised to know that poetry doesn’t always have to be about or need to involve emotion. Now I know what you’re thinking, but poetry is almost all emotion, it’s a person putting everything they are feeling onto paper pouring their heart out. Yes, in a way you’d be right but only to an extent. Nothing says poetry has to be about emotion or even written with it we just naturally assume this because in most cases when we feel down or want to express our emotions, some of us do so through poetry. Emotion may be a standard in poetry but it is not a priority, meaning it is not always necessary. Poetry invokes many different types of emotion from reading but the main point I’m getting across here is that it doesn’t need to be written with emotion. That’s not to say poetry without emotion isn’t as good but the fact is that it does exist and there are some examples of it.


When I wrote my first book, The Macabre Masterpiece: Poems of Horror and Gore I knew I wanted to write horror poetry. While I knew the poems would create emotions in the reader and the words written involve emotion I myself didn’t really use emotion to write them. They weren’t my experiences or something that had happened to me. They were written for entertainment and came from creation and imagination and not emotion. See? Poetry without emotion can be done. Another example of this is some of Edgar Allan Poe’s poems however I would imagine most did come from emotion, the emotion of depression as the man was always down and in a gloomy mood.


Poetry can be whatever you want it to be. It can be something you want people to know about you, something you want someone to know, or it can be a story in poetry form. One could say regardless of how and what you write about that emotion is needed in order to write it but I would have to disagree. I have nothing against writing with emotion, many of my poems I‘ve written have lots of and were written emotion I’m merely saying that sometimes although not always emotion and poetry do not always go hand in hand.

 

Poetry is a feeling and a creation. It is everything and it is nothing. Poetry with emotion could be said to be more real, more pure and authentic. Poetry without it is said to lack substance and real drive but again this is just assumed as a person can write a poetry about anything without emotion just as good as a poem with emotion can be written. Remember, no matter how you write poetry and regardless of what you write about it doesn’t have to be written with emotion but you can be believe that emotion is still a part and involved in it.

Like this article? Check out the rest of my blog and other posts on poetry. Also feel free to subscribe to my e-mail list and find out why it is that I love poetry so much. 


The Ten Best Wax Museums to Visit

Posted on April 10, 2019 at 6:10 PM

Wax Museums are an underrated source of entertainment. They are museums yes but they not just places to learn about the history of a person or place they are an experience to see great craftsmanship and feel as though your standing next to someone famous. Wax Museums are intriguing places because they can take you back in time, take you to a place in the present you never thought you’d be and make you feel as though you’re a part of something special because well, you are! Listed below are the top ten best wax museums in America that you should check out if you happen to be in the area or if you are traveling the country checking out wax museums!

 10. Jesse James Wax Museum in classic Route 66.

 You’ve probably heard all about one of the wild west’s most notorious and ruthless outlaws back in the day. His story has been told throughout history hence the reason his name still gets mentioned today. This museum is not only located in a nostalgic area in Route 66 but is all about the famed outlaw who took the west by storm and continues to fascinate people today.


9. House of Frankenstein Wax Museum

 Located in Lake George, New York this is a place absolutely perfect for horror fans. Aside from it’s name sake star of Frankenstein the museum also features many horror characters sure to scare and excite you to tears. There’s also other horrific looking figures that will leave you talking about them long after you leave.

 

8. Hollywood Wax Museum in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

 Okay so chances are most people don’t go to Myrtle Beach to check this place out but perhaps they should. This version of the Hollywood Wax Museum is entertaining, enthralling and a great place to stop by before you head to the beach. It features many celebrities and even had zombie figures because why not, right?


7. National Great Blacks Museum

Located in Baltimore, Maryland, the museum is a dedication and honor in showing African American History. You’ll learn a lot of stuff you may not have ever learned in school and not only is it educational but very entertaining and a must-see for wax museums.


6. Potter’s Wax Museum

Located in St. Augustine, Florida, it’s said to be the first ever wax museum opened in the United States. The museum has many historical figures, celebrities as well as many of horror’s scary characters. Seeing as it’s the said to be first ever wax museum opened in the U.S, why wouldn’t you want to go?


5. Rock Legends Wax Museum

Located in Niagara Falls, New York this museum is perfect for all music and rock and roll fans. The museum features rock stars from the past as well the current ones. It’s a great place to learn the history of rock and roll and get a selfie with your favorite music star!


4. National Presidential Wax Museum

Who said there’s nothing exciting in South Dakota? Aside from Mt. Rushmore the state also has the National Presidential Museum. The place has over 100 historical figures and features every president and is a great place to catch up on your presidential history!


3. Salem Wax Museum & Witch's Dungeon Classic Movie Museum

Two places close to home that I just couldn’t separate!


The Salem Wax Museum is of course located in Salem, Massachusetts and as someone who’s been there I can tell you it’s quite a cool and interesting place! Of course you’ll see figures and learn about the infamous Witch Trials of 1692 but you’ll also learn about the history of the town and how they came to be so witchy as well as how the town came to be founded. There’s also a Pirate Museum in Salem that is really interesting if your into piracy.


Witch’s Dungeon Classic Movie Museum is located in Bristol, Connecticut and is an absolute must-see for horror and classic horror movie fans. The place is owned by Cortlandt Hull, the great nephew of horror actor Henry Hull who played the werewolf in The Werewolf of London. The place has many classic horror figures such as Frankenstein’s Monster, Count Dracula, the Phantom of the Opera and Nosferatu.


2. Madame Tussaud’s in Hollywood, California

If you ever find yourself in Hollywood and you still don’t come across any celebrities walking the streets it’s okay you can still meet them! Madame Tussauds is the most famous place known for wax figures. It’s right next to the Hollywood Walk of Fame, is an epic three story building and features 115 celebrity wax figures!


1. Hollywood Wax Museum in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee

There’s lots to do in Tennessee and if your planning a trip there you better be sure to add this to your places to visit. You’ll get to see old famous actors and actresses like silent film star Charlie Chaplin as well as Norma Jean herself, Marilyn Monroe. There’s lots to see and is truly the definition of a wax museum.


To find out more on these places visit thishttps://www.drivethenation.com/best-wax-museums-in-america/" target="_blank"> article by Melissa Martinez.

And be sure to subscribe to my e-mail list and check out my own creative honor nod to wax with my novel, The Wax Factory due out on May 31st!

Deadly Cannibals: The Eerie Mystery Of The Wendigo

Posted on February 11, 2019 at 3:45 PM

The Wendigo is a mythical monster in Algonquin folklore. It’s a considered to be that of a man eating creature and an evil spirit known to the northern forests of the Atlantic Coast and other parts of United States and even Canada. The wendigo may appear as a vicious monster with some characteristics of a human and is also known to be a creature whose spirit has possessed a human being and made them become disturbing and unpredictable. It is usually connected to and associated with murder, greed, and other known evil notions. The legend of the Wendigo comes from a controversial modern medical term known as Wendigo psychosis, described by psychiatrists as a syndrome with symptoms such as an intense craving for human flesh and fear of becoming a cannibal.


There are well over two dozen different types of spellings for the Wendigo. Many of these come from several different Native American Algonquin tribes. In most cases and incidents the Wendigo are known for being cannibalistic, evil and supernatural. They are also associated winter and famine. In some cases, humans are known to be overpowered by greed and could turn into wendigos. It is also said that Humans could also turn into wendigos just simply by being in contact with them or around them for too long.


It’s suggested that Native Americans understand the wendigo. The Wendigo can take over a person with an idea of corruptive and disturbing behavior, greed or even consumption. This idea states that a person of evil intentions or who favor certain sins are prone to becoming taken over or influenced by wendigos. Wendigos are known to be violent and aggressive by their nature. They also have the instinct to kill and are known to be cannibals. In popular culture the Wendigo has appeared all over. It has appeared in several fiction books even having some fictional books solely written for it. They have appeared in comics and graphic novels as well as movies and television shows.


While the wendigo is known from myth and in popular culture there is still a mystery behind the creature that gives off it’s evil eerie presence. Wendigos don’t just appear as stated above it takes a person thinking evil self-absorbed thoughts and having ill intent in order for them to appear or take over. Yet even this idea and their having some notoriety, they still have a mysterious aura about them. Wendigos tendencies are enough to scare or frighten a person however, they are also known to have a foul smell to them and they look like beasts with their bones using showing and having blood on them. Wendigos could be characterized as several personifications of evil and their presence is of the darkest intent.


Adding to popular culture, one of the poems in my horror poetry book, The Macabre Masterpiece: Repressed Carnage, is called The Wendigo which is my take on the mythical creature.

The Wendigo

In the harsh winter climates

There lurks a suspicious creature

Half person/half beast

Imagine a skeletal moose-like bigfoot

That feasts on human flesh

It comes from an old Algonquin myth

Its said a human can transform into one

Or vice versa, either way it's chilling

It’s a vicious spirit with malicious intent

Violent by nature, fueled by greed

With gluttonous tendencies

Its exterior is that of mainly bone

With skin that drapes like a canvas

Lips tarnished and bloody

Not to mention they smell horrid

An odor of death and decay

But most of all it wishes to feed

And feed it shall if one encounters it

Beware of the Wendigo

The treacherous famine walker

The beast of starvation

A cannibalistic being of death

 

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Wax Museums, Do You Think They're Scary?

Posted on January 21, 2019 at 4:40 PM

Wax Museums, they show famous people and help them live on forever. The craftsmanship of the figures within these museums are absolutely timeless. When we step into a museum we are sometimes taken back in time or up close and personal with some of our favorite people. One of the most famous wax museums is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madame_Tussauds" target="_blank">Madame Tussaud's in London, known for its amazing wax figures. Over the years many other https://www.madametussauds.com/" target="_blank">locations of the most famous wax museum have appeared all over the globe. Wax museums are meant to be an experience and entertainment of education and fun. They serve as a purpose to showcase and immortalize people from history and people we currently see in today's society. However, a quick observation of one of your favorite celebrities or perhaps an infamous killer in wax makes you think it's so real that it's as if the person is standing there before you. This isn't a bad thing but if it's someone evil or bad such as an infamous killer it sort of gives you the creeps and for a brief moment you get the sensation that the wax figure is so life like that it may come to life!


One of my favorite https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0052520/" target="_blank">Twilight Zone episodes called, "https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0734665/" target="_blank">The New Exhibit" tells of a curator of a wax museum who is in control of the Murderer's Row section of the museum. Here we see wax figures of infamous killers and the most well known of them is Jack the Ripper. The museum closes and the man decides to keep the figures down in his basement where he keeps them cool. He also swears that they are starting to come to life. The reason I reference this episode of the Twilight Zone is because it's a perfect example of our fears as human beings of wax figures looking so lifelike that you'd swear on your life that they themselves breathe life and are real. Also, it's not until we encounter an evil figure made of wax that we get chills and forget that it is wax but our minds wander as we try and try to remember that they are only made of wax, nothing more.


The resemblance of some of these figures is sometimes eerie and creepy. One thing as people that we tend to do is associate figures, dummies, dolls, and mannequins in the horror culture by bringing them to life and giving them real-life characteristics. This is why some of us(including myself as I'm afraid of ventriloquist dummies) are scared of all these things especially wax figures because we know they aren't real but because we've seen so many horror films that depicting them coming to life that sometimes we just assume they will come to life and let our imaginations get the best of us. Some dolls are just creepy looking, mannequins aren't always the best things to be near while your alone in a mall, dummies are always being brought to life in cinema and literature and wax figures just look so darn life like that you'd be a fool not to get scared or have the thought cross your mind.


Imagine you're in a museum and you're the only one. You walk around looking at the figures and taking it all in, the history, the detail in each figures face, the feeling as though you're among real people. Suddenly you look around your shoulder and turn around. You look back at the figures where they stand or are in the same position they've always been and will continue to be in. Then you get that odd feeling in your stomach, that feeling you can't shake. Your mind starts thinking strange thoughts and your hearts beating a mile a minute and before you know it your thoughts and heartbeats have been coated in shock, hysteria, and fear. You feel as though the figures will come to life at any minute and harm you or even worse kill you! Surely, you've experienced this or at least thought about it? If you haven't well then the next time you decide to go to a wax museum you better hope other people are there, otherwise you'll remember this article and all I've said and you'll be looking over your shoulder thinking that maybe just maybe your not alone after all.


I'm intrigued by the idea of whether or not wax museums are scary or not because my sixth novel takes place in a wax factory and deals with the principles of wroking with wax. I wonder, since wax figures and museums are scary, wouldn't factories of wax be just as scary knowing they use the same materials and elements? The Wax Factory could be as scary as a museum but I'll leave that for youto decide.

 


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What Is Urban Gothic?

Posted on January 14, 2019 at 4:50 PM

Gothic. Chances are you know what it is and can define what it is in some way. Urban Gothic? Well, not many people know what urban gothic is so that's what this article is about. It will explain to you what urban gothic is and give you a general idea of examples of what truly defines it. First off, Urban Gothic is a subgenre of gothic that deals with industrial and post-industrial urban society. The term was first coined in the 19th century in Britain as well as Ireland and the U.S. Urban gothic is a part of film and television as well as literature where it originally was seen. Early on there was a boost in gothic literature and other classic types of genres this is what started to make gothic novels more popular and a genre slowly on the rise. Urban Gothic tends to be an idea that deals with the generalizations of the regular definition of gothic; dark themes and elements with a classy and elegant representation. It usually deals with the descriptions of dark, dreary and vivid backgrounds of a lively yet at the same time lonely setting. Settings of rural locations where horror meets danger and adventurous levels. It's also known to put people in horror situations such as paranormal and supernatural creating for an overall dark feel and eerie look.


Some early examples of Urban Gothic are Robert Louis Stevenson's Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), and Irish novels such as Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890), and Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897). One thing you can immediately see is that all these books share common themes. They are all set in Britain, are gothic literature and also have that element of the unknown where the setting and the people are dark, mysterious and yet are strange and profound. It's these books that are the real first known case of urban gothic and are absolute classics. These novels, as well as the genre itself, helped to create two more branches in the gothic genre, southern gothic and suburban gothic. In many ways, urban gothic is sort of the indie of gothic's, it is a subgenre of Gothic but has enough in its own right to stand on its own. Frankenstein, some of Edgar Allan Poe's works as well as other well-known authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne have works that are in some ways considered to be Urban Gothic. Another fine and classic example is Phantom of the Opera that does a lovely job of blending class and horror together to create a strong vivid gothic story of romanticism.


Modern gothic has helped the sub-genres, like urban gothic for a smooth transition so that they keep what makes the genre unique but at the same time adding a modern twist or flare. Some examples of modern day urban and suburban gothic are Anne Rice's Vampire Chronicles, several of graphic novelist Frank Miller's books such as Batman and Sin City and the film, The Crow. Again like the books described earlier, these books and films all have something in common. The dark setting that's dark yet engaging and simplistic giving off that mystery element within an industrial rural location coated in a classic blend of horror and classical gothic.


New Orleans is quite the city so despite being loud at times there's also a certain prestige to the city making it a place where vampires tend to dwell in literature and making it a perfect location of Urban Gothic. Nothing says urban gothic quite like the dark foggy yet strangely alluring streets and alleys of New Orleans. Also, take a look at Sin City, it's a dirty and dangerous place yet has that mantra of urban gothic with it's industrial and rural setting. The modern adaptation and take of urban gothic shows that the genre can be enjoyed by those who enjoy classic and modern gothic literature and cinema.


So that's what Urban Gothic is. Chances are by now that you've realized that you not only have known what it is but you enjoy and have read and seen what urban gothic is whether it's from a classic or modern sense. It's a subgenre that helps the flow of gothic within dangerous yet classy situations. It's the taboo of gothic, it's a representation of how shadows get lonely sometimes and most of all it's still being written and made into movies today. So the next time your at your local library or in the mood for a gothic film but you still want that current feel, look into Urban Gothic, it will not disappoint you.

For images on Urban Gothic check out my Urban Gothic board on Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/justinbienvenue/urban-gothic/" target="_blank">https://www.pinterest.com/justinbienvenue/urban-gothic/

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